The challenges you should know in producing an animated series these days

(The following is written based on my own experience. It is meant to give independent producers a clear view of the current market situation. The following does not apply to big studios who has deep pockets or with strong commercial channels)

I have attended a Children TV Trade Show in the US recently. At the event, I have met a couple of independent producers. When they presented their IP to me, I am quite surprised that they are still trapped in the old system; expecting the TV licensing fee alone to cover the production cost. (Covering production cost is hard these days. Not to even mention profit. Even DVD market is dead.) One really need a licensing/merchandising strategy. It is no long an option. It is really hard to create an animated TV series or IP just to tell story without a commercial strategy in mind. I know it sounds horrible in a creative stand point. It is really not easy to raise funds these days.

I hope the numbers below will help you. When I first started, I was looking all over for such facts. Its not easy to locate them. This is first hand experience.

When I first step into the US, I heard that you can sell a half an hour episode at USD$50k. In 2007, (my personal experience) I sold at USD$25k per half hour  episode. In 2010, it drops to USD$15k per half hour episode. Now I have buyer in the US asking for free. I am not joking. The market kept changing for the past

Assuming your full production budget is about USD$5M (When I first got into the market, I was told that this budget should be able to recoup just by TV sales) and you are able to sell the TV series to 80 to 100 countries (which is not easy for indie producer) The TV licensing fees add up for these countries  can only cover between 1/4 to 1/5 of your production cost. I have seen independent producers still looking at producing it at USD$7M to USD$9M at the recent trade show. Its going to be very risky.

I am not saying there is no exceptional case. If you have a strong executive producer to back you up, hopefully it could be more. I am just being conservative. Last I heard is that some US OTT channel is looking for original content . They can finance up to 60% of the production cost. This does not include additional dubbing cost of 20 languages. Payment is made in every 3 months and can only come in after you have delivered the entire series. It takes up to 1 year to pay you back the 60%.

Typically, there are only about 6 countries who are able to pay between 4 to 5 digits per half hour episode. Or if you are lucky, you can get a couple of pan regional deals (e.g Pan Asia or Pan Europe Deal) which will also pay about 4 digits per half hour. The rest of the world is paying only 3 digits per half hour especially in Asia. If you add all these numbers up, you will know it is not easy to cover more than USD $4M of your production cost.

Currently, some of the countries that you might be able to get subsidy or investment to offset your cost is Canada, France, Ireland, Malaysia, Korea and China. The rest of the world is not that easy.

One need to have a strategy in place. Your IP needs to be able to engage the sophisticated audience not just on TV. But also on all new digital platforms. Your concept and designs probably needs to have Toys, Computer Games and Themeparks (China) in mind. (Now even Netflix has started to look at Toys now.) There are some  strategic investors looking for good IP to feed their business. These strategic investors will come in right from the beginning. No longer after the release of the series.

Korean producers are very savvy and focus. You will see many of them armed with concept based on the needs of strategic investors. The only challenge is you might end up having too many similar concepts. Hence to challenge your creativity, you need to find a way to create a concept that stands out from the rest.

Don’t get me wrong. I am not discouraging indie producers NOT to work on your own IP. In fact, if your primary survival is servicing (outsource work), you should work on your own IP as competing in prices in outsource work is not the way to go for long term survival. What I am trying to put across here is to change your strategy. Know the market. Build your connections. Get yourself updated with the latest trend. The world economy and technology is shifting its place. In business, there will always be a change. As long as you move with the change. You will survive.

Something I wrote previously. Hope you find it useful as well.
https://entrepreneurshipinanimation.wordpress.com/2016/05/14/various-potential-strategic-investors-for-animation/

 

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